Steroid treatment crohn's disease

People with this risk are usually advised to have their large intestine routinely checked after having had Crohn's disease for about ten years. This involves a look into the large intestine by a flexible telescope (colonoscopy) every now and then and taking small samples of bowel (biopsies) for examination. It is usually combined with chromoscopy - the use of dye spray which shows up suspicious changes more easily. Depending on the findings of this test and on other factors, you will be put into a risk category which is called low, intermediate or high. 'Other factors' include:

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This class of medications modulates or suppresses the body’s immune system response so it cannot cause ongoing inflammation. Immunomodulators generally are used in people for whom aminosalicylates and corticosteroids haven’t been effective or have been only partially effective. They may be useful in reducing or eliminating the need for corticosteroids. They also may be effective in maintaining remission in people who haven’t responded to other medications given for this purpose. Immunomodulators may take several months to begin working.

This is because corticosteroids are very similar to the naturally occurring hormone, cortisol, and when you take steroids as medicine your adrenal glands reduce or stop cortisol production. This is known as adrenal suppression. If you suddenly stop your steroid treatment, it may take some time before the adrenal glands start producing cortisol normally again. This could leave you with much lower levels of cortisol in your body, which can mean that your body does not respond so well to stressful situations, causing nausea, fatigue and light-headedness.

Steroid treatment crohn's disease

steroid treatment crohn's disease

This is because corticosteroids are very similar to the naturally occurring hormone, cortisol, and when you take steroids as medicine your adrenal glands reduce or stop cortisol production. This is known as adrenal suppression. If you suddenly stop your steroid treatment, it may take some time before the adrenal glands start producing cortisol normally again. This could leave you with much lower levels of cortisol in your body, which can mean that your body does not respond so well to stressful situations, causing nausea, fatigue and light-headedness.

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