Intranasal steroid

Steroid nasal sprays rarely cause side-effects. This is because they are applied directly to the nose and very little of this medicine is absorbed into the body. Therefore, they are much less likely to cause side-effects in other parts of the body. Occasionally, they cause dryness, crusting, and bleeding of the nose. If this occurs, stop it for a few days and then restart. There have been reports of nasal steroids possibly having an effect on behaviour, particularly in children. This is thought to be rare. However, a few people have reported hyperactivity, problems sleeping, anxiety, depression, and aggression.

There are no data with intranasal fluticasone furoate in patients with hepatic impairment. Data are available following inhaled administration of fluticasone furoate (as fluticasone furoate or fluticasone furoate/vilanterol) to subjects with hepatic impairment that are also applicable for intranasal dosing. A study of a single 400 microgram dose of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B) resulted in increased C max (42 %) and AUC(0-∞) (172 %) and a modest (on average 23 %) decrease in cortisol levels in patients compared to healthy subjects. Following repeat dosing of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate/vilanterol for 7 days, there was an increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure (on average two-fold as measured by AUC (0–24) ) in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) compared with healthy subjects. The increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 200/25 micrograms) was associated with an average 34% reduction in serum cortisol compared with healthy subjects. There was no effect on serum cortisol in subjects with severe hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 100/ micrograms). Based on these findings the average predicted exposure of 110 micrograms of intranasal fluticasone furoate in this patient population would not be expected to result in suppression of cortisol.

The major part of the approximately 150 cm 2 surface in the human nasal cavity is covered by respiratory epithelium, across which systemic drug absorption can be achieved. The olfactory epithelium is situated in the upper posterior part and covers approximately 10 cm 2 of the human nasal cavity. The nerve cells of the olfactory epithelium project into the olfactory bulb of the brain, which provides a direct connection between the brain and the external environment. The transfer of drugs to the brain from the blood circulation is normally hindered by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), which is virtually impermeable to passive diffusion of all but small, lipophilic substances. However, if drug substances can be transferred along the olfactory nerve cells, they can bypass the BBB and enter the brain directly., [12] [13]

Intranasal steroid

intranasal steroid

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