Alopecia areata treatment steroids

Androgenic Alopecia - Androgenetic
Androgenetic alopecia In men, or male pattern baldness, is recognized increasingly as a physically and psychologically harmful medical condition. Androgenetic alopecia affects at least half of white men by the age of 50 years. Although androgenetic alopecia does not appear to cause direct physical harm, hair loss can result in physical harm because hair protects against sunburn, cold, mechanical injury, and ultraviolet light. Hair loss also can psychologically affect the balding individual and can Influence others' perceptions of him. A progressive condition, male pattern baldness is known to depend on the presence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone - DHT - and on a genetic predisposition for this condition. Medicines, hair transplantation, and cosmetic aids have been used to manage male pattern baldness. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved hair-loss drugs - the potassium channel opener minoxidil and the dihydrotestosterone synthesis inhibitor finasteride -- are somewhat effective for controlling male pattern baldness with long-term daily use. Regardless of which treatment is chosen for alopecia, defining and addressing the patient's expectations regarding therapy are paramount in determining outcome.

How topical immunotherapy works is not clear. A substance is put on affected skin to make the skin react like an allergy. A commonly used substance is diphencyprone (DPCP). Increasing strengths of this substance are placed on the affected skin once a week over several weeks until the skin looks like it has mild dermatitis (eczema). The skin reaction seems to affect the process involved in causing alopecia areata in some way to allow hair to re-grow. Side-effects can be troublesome. For example, some people develop severe skin reactions. Treating children with topical immunotherapy is controversial.

The typical pattern is one or more bald patches appear on the scalp or any other part of the body. These tend to be around in shape, and about the size of a large coin. A Family member, friend, or hairdresser may be the first person to notice the bare patch or patches. Apart from the hairless patch, the scalp usually looks healthy. In few cases, the patient may feel redness, scaling, mild burning, or a slight itchy feeling on an affected part. Quite often the bald patch or patches re-grow hair within a few months. If hair grows back it may not have its primary color and looks grey or white. The original color eventually returns after several months. Sometimes, the initial hairless patch re-grows hair whilst a new bare patch is developing. Often several small hairless patches develop and merge into a larger bald area. Patches on body hair, beard, eyebrows, or eyelashes can be seen in some cases. Large bald patches develop in some people. Whole scalp hair loss is known as alopecia totalis and complete body hair loss is known as alopecia universalis. The nails are affected in about 1 in five cases and can become pitted or a bald patch first develops, it is difficult to predict how it will progress. Alopecia areata behaves in a different way in everyone. However below are the classifications of how it may progress.

The course of typical alopecia areata is not predictable with a high likelihood of spontaneous remission. The longer the period of time of hair loss and the larger the area involved, the less likely the hair will regrow spontaneously. Therefore, there are a variety of treatments, but none of these can confidently be predicted to impact the course of this disease. Steroid injections may be very helpful in restarting the hair growth cycle in treated areas. Steroid creams, lotions and shampoos have been used for many years but are of limited benefit at best.

Alopecia areata treatment steroids

alopecia areata treatment steroids

The course of typical alopecia areata is not predictable with a high likelihood of spontaneous remission. The longer the period of time of hair loss and the larger the area involved, the less likely the hair will regrow spontaneously. Therefore, there are a variety of treatments, but none of these can confidently be predicted to impact the course of this disease. Steroid injections may be very helpful in restarting the hair growth cycle in treated areas. Steroid creams, lotions and shampoos have been used for many years but are of limited benefit at best.

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